Saturday, 4 June 2011

Live reporting from Madrid Acampadasol protest

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Photo By Gail Orenstein/The Web 3.0 Lab/Clima/Madrid
Demonstrating the Clima.me tool for measuring twitter density to the communication tent in Madrid. We showed the team how to use high and low density comparisons to guage the scale and activity of protests. These guys have a very international and well educated team of techies right at the heart of the protest. Not surprisingly it was the best place to find competent English speakers.

The communication center is a core part of this protest, but do not think of the Spanish camping protest as a Social Media or Facebook protest. People are very clear that the reacl community building is happening on the ground. Rather social media and computers provide tools for this process. People expressed inspiration from things learned from the Arab Spring, and appreciation for how the Internet has helped organize the protest: but the real event is happening between people or within small groups that gather to discuss issues late in to the Spanish night.



Photo By Gail Orenstein/The Web 3.0 Lab/Clima/Madrid
But just as it is possible to over state the importance of Web 3.0 Internet and mobile technology in the protests in Madrid, it is also just as wrong to understate them. Everything that is happening here is being captured, posted, and shared via a vast army of mobile machines to geo-social networks. The protest in Madrid has to embrace a Open Collaborative media environment carried around by the tens of thousands of ordinary people who pass through the protest every day.

Photo By Gail Orenstein/The Web 3.0 Lab/Clima/Madrid

Social media impacts the in a rich matrix of complex relationships. Events take place that are pre-arranged online. During the event people put away their mobile phones and start talking or acting live. People coming to see what is going on will video tap or photograph the event. Many of these people post this video and photos to social media or blogs. From there people regionally and globally have access to the events. Many people around the world are encourage. Some people even fly down to Madrid to see what is happening. This analysis then comes back in to many of the participants in the continual feedback loop with is at the heart of Web 3.0.
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In keeping with the recent protests in the Arab world we are seeing extremely high tweeting coming from the site of an evolving protest in Puerta del Sol Madrid.

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